Myths About North American Bats

There are many myths and false stereotypes about bats in North America, and even all across the world. Here in this blog, we’ll explore a few of those urban legends and clear up the misunderstandings surrounding these highly important and fascinating mammals.

Common Bat Myths

One common myth is that all bats carry the Rabies virus and infect millions of people around the continent every year. This is far from the truth. The reality is that fewer than 10 people in the last 50 years have been infected with Rabies as a result of a bat bite. Bats typically avoid people, and rarely attack unless cornered or provoked. If you are ever bitten by a bat, all you need to do is consult a doctor and you’ll be just fine.

Another bat urban legend is that some bat species consume blood, namely human blood. This urban legend is not entirely false, just embellished a bit. It is called a vampire bat. They do not actually suck blood, but rather, initiate a bite to a large warm-blooded animal, and then lick up the seeping blood. It is usually cattle that are the common hosts for Vampire bats. They do not bite or consume human blood.

Another common myth concerning bats is that all bats are blind. This is also not true. The misconception comes from the fact that Microbats use echolocation to hunt for insects and food at night. All bats actually see quite well during the day, it’s just that they mostly remain active at night, where they do not count on their eyesight to get around.

Have you ever heard that bats have hundreds of litters of bat babies? Well hopefully not, because this is not the truth. Bats are mammals and have a gestation period of about six months. Once they give birth, it is to usually one bat pup, and in rare cases, it may birth twins. It takes a long time for an entire bat colony to grow. Once bats are grown enough to withstand predators and fly on their own, they can live to almost 30 years!

Many also believe that bat droppings are poisonous. There are some special circumstances to this myth, but for the most part, it is untrue. Bat droppings are referred to as “guano”. Guano is a huge resource for many villages and tribes around the world. People craft household necessities from guano and use it for fertilizer as well. There are many uses for bat guano. However, bat guano can be harmful to ones health if it is digested or inhaled during a sporing stage. This is when fungus species begin to grow on the guano. Around large amounts of guano, people are encouraged to wear face respirators to avoid inhaling the fungus that can cause Histoplasmosis.

The Truth About Bats

Between movies, television, Halloween, and childhood stories, bats have been given an unfair stereotype. They are actually fascinating mammals with a sophisticated system for hunting and flying at night. They breed their young as humans do, having one pup a year; and they have incredible survival skills! They will not fly into your hair or suck your cat’s blood. They are trusting creatures that deserve respect and peace. If they are a nuisance to your property, use a local bat removal service to have them safely excluded.

Indianapolis Bat Removal

Call 317-535-4605 for prompt and professional Indianapolis bat removal and control services. We provide safe and humane bat removal for commercial and residential properties throughout Central Indiana. Trust us to remove bats and prevent their return, all at an affordable price. We are DNR licensed and insured wildlife control contractors with more than 20 years of experience working with nuisance bats. Call 317-535-4605 to get rid of bats in Indianapolis, IN today.

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